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This is what happens when a Jewish foodie fundraises

As a foodie who also happens to be a graduate student at the Jewish Theological Seminary, I suppose it's no surprise that I often combine my passions for Judaism and food. Memories of the Great Synagogue in Florence, Italy are … Read More

By / August 7, 2007

As a foodie who also happens to be a graduate student at the Jewish Theological Seminary, I suppose it's no surprise that I often combine my passions for Judaism and food. Memories of the Great Synagogue in Florence, Italy are paired with recollections of a nearby trattoria, with images of horseshoe-arched entrances living alongside equally potent memories of truffled pasta. A similar melding occurs when I teach, and of course, when I write on my blog, where Jewish history finds its way into posts about beignets or whatever else is cooking in my kitchen.

The latest manifestation of this habit? A cookbook raffle intended to raise money for the 2007 Jewish Environmental Bike Ride. The ride is sponsored by Hazon whose food team I joined this past May, and proceeds from the ride are used to fund a wide array of worthy projects: 10 organic farms around the US, an organic farming initiative in Israel, and a food curriculum for Jewish day schools, which teaches children about a vast array of important topics surrounding Judaism, nutrition and the environment. These are just a few of the initiatives funded by the ride and I wanted to contribute to the cause – but what could I do?

That's when a crazy idea hit me. As a foodblogger who has reviewed cookbooks on her site, I've been in touch with publishing houses like Hyperion and HarperCollins – what if I asked them to donate books to a raffle that would raise funds for the NY Ride? I wasn't sure they would go for it but it never hurts to ask, so I shot a few emails their way and, to my surprise, they were eager to support the cause. Now thanks to donations from Hyperion, HarperCollins, Ten Speed Press, Penguin and Chronicle Books I'm holding a cookbook raffle on my site, Baking and Books, with more than 70 prizes for raffle participants to win. Tickets cost only $5 with free tickets being thrown into the mix for donations of $25 (1 free ticket) and $50 (2 free tickets). The raffle is a fun way to support Jewish education while also increasing awareness about the environment and important food issues. Check it out.

 

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